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World Themes: Washington Perspectives A 8051
World Themes is a two semester offering. Each semester will engage students in a dynamic study of global perspectives on various themes. For example themes such as conflict, technologies, etc. will be examined through the lenses of history, economics, civics, and geography. Each thematic study will link to the Washington context in order to give students an understanding of the role the state has played in world events.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: StandardGRADE: 10
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8052 - World Themes: Washington Perspectives B
World Themes: Washington Perspectives B 8052
World Themes is a two semester offering. Each semester will engage students in a dynamic study of global perspectives on various themes. For example themes such as conflict, technologies, etc. will be examined through the lenses of history, economics, civics, and geography. Each thematic study will link to the Washington context in order to give students an understanding of the role the state has played in world events.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: StandardGRADE: 10
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8051 - World Themes: Washington Perspectives A
AP World History A 8061
Students will develop a greater understanding of the changes in the global processes, and contacts and interactions between different types of human societies. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks, their causes and consequences. Classroom work and assigned readings emphasize relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues a well as the analysis of types of historical evidence. Focused primarily on the past thousand years of global experience, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set human stage prior to 1000 CE. Students are encouraged but not required to take the AP World History exam. This course is an alternative to World Themes: Washington Perspectives and will fulfill the 10th grade social studies credit. A pre-requisite for enrollment in this course is passing all three trimesters of the 7th grade Washington State History course.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 10
PREREQUISITE: Students must either have passed all three trimesters of 7th grade Washington State History OR take the Canvas course for WashingtonState History competency in order to take this course instead of World Themes: Washington Perspectives.
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8062 - AP World History B
AP World History B 8062
Students will develop a greater understanding of the changes in the global processes, and contacts and interactions between different types of human societies. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks, their causes and consequences. Classroom work and assigned readings emphasize relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues a well as the analysis of types of historical evidence. Focused primarily on the past thousand years of global experience, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set human stage prior to 1000 CE. Students are encouraged but not required to take the AP World History exam. This course is an alternative to World Themes: Washington Perspectives and will fulfill the 10th grade social studies credit. A pre-requisite for enrollment in this course is passing all three trimesters of the 7th grade Washington State History course.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 10
PREREQUISITE: Students must either have passed all three trimesters of 7th grade Washington State History OR take the Canvas course for WashingtonState History competency in order to take this course instead of World Themes: Washington Perspectives.
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8061 - AP World History A
U.S. History A 8221
In this course students will study specific topics from U.S. History during our nation’s development from post Civil War through the 20th Century. Topics addressed include the following: Emergence of America as a World Power, reform, prosperity and depression, World War I and World War II, the Cold War, International Relations and Post World War II including domestic, political, social and economic issues.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: StandardGRADE: 11
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8222 - U.S. History B
U.S. History B 8222
In this course students will study specific topics from U.S. History during our nation’s development from post Civil War through the 20th Century. Topics addressed include the following: Emergence of America as a World Power, reform, prosperity and depression, World War I and World War II, the Cold War, International Relations and Post World War II including domestic, political, social and economic issues.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: StandardGRADE: 11
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8221 - U.S. History A
AP U.S. History A 8241
The AP program in U.S. History is designed to provide students with analysis skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems, issues, and materials in United States History. Students will learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability and their importance – and weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarships. (College Board) The course will prepare students for collegiate academic study by making demands upon them equivalent to a college course. Students are encouraged but not required to take the AP U.S. History exam.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 11
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8242 - AP U.S. History B
AP U.S. History B 8242
The AP program in U.S. History is designed to provide students with analysis skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems, issues, and materials in United States History. Students will learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability and their importance – and weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarships. (College Board) The course will prepare students for collegiate academic study by making demands upon them equivalent to a college course. Students are encouraged but not required to take the AP U.S. History exam.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 11
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8241 - AP U.S. History A
CWP Contemporary World Problems and Civic Responsibilities A 8421
The focus of study for this course is current world, national, state, and local issues as seen through the lenses of civics, economics, and geography. Students will read, discuss, and write about current themes such as human rights, civic action and responsibility, globalization and the economy, environmental issues, and allocation of resources. The knowledge and skills students will gain in this course will prepare them for world citizenship, civic participation, and financial literacy. This course will fulfill the graduation requirements for CWP and Civics.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: StandardGRADE: 12
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8422 - CWP Contemporary World Problems and Civic Responsibilities B
CWP Contemporary World Problems and Civic Responsibilities B 8422
The focus of study for this course is current world, national, state, and local issues as seen through the lenses of civics, economics, and geography. Students will read, discuss, and write about current themes such as human rights, civic action and responsibility, globalization and the economy, environmental issues, and allocation of resources. The knowledge and skills students will gain in this course will prepare them for world citizenship, civic participation, and financial literacy. This course will fulfill the graduation requirements for CWP and Civics.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: StandardGRADE: 12
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8421 - CWP Contemporary World Problems and Civic Responsibilities A
AP United States Government and Politics A 8463
This course is an introduction to the United States constitution, national policymaking institutions, their relationship to individuals and state governments, and the avenues through which citizens access the policymaking process. AP U.S. Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret US. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students will be able to analyze relevant theories and concepts and develop connections. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes within the political process. This course is designed to be a college level course that entails more than what is expected from other classes. Students are encouraged but not required to take the AP U.S. Government and Politics exam in the spring. This course fulfills the Contemporary World Problems requirement.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 12
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8464 - AP United States Government and Politics B
AP United States Government and Politics B 8464
This course is an introduction to the United States constitution, national policymaking institutions, their relationship to individuals and state governments, and the avenues through which citizens access the policymaking process. AP U.S. Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret US. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students will be able to analyze relevant theories and concepts and develop connections. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes within the political process. This course is designed to be a college level course that entails more than what is expected from other classes. Students are encouraged but not required to take the AP U.S. Government and Politics exam in the spring. This course fulfills the Contemporary World Problems requirement.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 12
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8463 - AP United States Government and Politics A
RS CWP RSCWP
No description available
CREDIT: 1TYPE: Non AvailableGRADE: 11-12
RS US HISTORY RSUSH
No description available
CREDIT: 1TYPE: Non AvailableGRADE: 11-12
Social Studies Electives
AP United States Government and Politics A 8463
This course is an introduction to the United States constitution, national policymaking institutions, their relationship to individuals and state governments, and the avenues through which citizens access the policymaking process. AP U.S. Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret US. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students will be able to analyze relevant theories and concepts and develop connections. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes within the political process. This course is designed to be a college level course that entails more than what is expected from other classes. Students are encouraged but not required to take the AP U.S. Government and Politics exam in the spring. This course fulfills the Contemporary World Problems requirement.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 12
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8464 - AP United States Government and Politics B
AP United States Government and Politics B 8464
This course is an introduction to the United States constitution, national policymaking institutions, their relationship to individuals and state governments, and the avenues through which citizens access the policymaking process. AP U.S. Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret US. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students will be able to analyze relevant theories and concepts and develop connections. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes within the political process. This course is designed to be a college level course that entails more than what is expected from other classes. Students are encouraged but not required to take the AP U.S. Government and Politics exam in the spring. This course fulfills the Contemporary World Problems requirement.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 12
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8463 - AP United States Government and Politics A
AP Psychology A 8685
The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in the science and practice. This course will prepare students to take the AP Psychology exam in the spring semester.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 10-12
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8686 - AP Psychology B
AP Psychology B 8686
The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in the science and practice. This course will prepare students to take the AP Psychology exam in the spring semester.
CREDIT: 0.5TYPE: Advanced PlacementGRADE: 10-12
COREQUISITES: If you take this course, you must also take 8685 - AP Psychology A